Foreign policy affects every aspect of our lives, and is determined by an elite few whom often operate to maintain the status quo and institutional bias. 

The Centre for Feminist Foreign Policy is proud to lead the way in making foreign policy more feminist, more transparent, and more intersectional.

 

 

Our Mission:

CFFP Mission.png

Our Vision:

centre for feminist foreign policy vision
 
 

Our Values:

INTERSECTIONALITY: We acknowledge that varying forms of oppression intersect with one another to shape peoples' lived experiences, and we remain mindful and inquisitive of these oppressions. An intersectional approach is key to achieving and creating a foreign policy that puts humans - and not special interests - at its core and leaves no one behind. 

COLLABORATION over competition: We are focused on working collaboratively with organizations and people who share our aims and objectives, and who will use our resources to develop public support for feminist foreign policy. 

INTEGRITY: We do what we say, and are bold in our statements and ideas. We are foreign policy nerds by education and activists by heart and will always speak truth to power in the quest of making foreign policy more inclusive. 

 

 

So what's a feminist foreign policy anyway?

A feminist foreign policy is a framework which elevates the everyday lived experience of marginalized communities to the forefront and provides a broader and deeper analysis of global issues. It takes a step outside the black box approach of traditional foreign policy thinking and its focus on military force, violence, and domination by offering an alternate and intersectional rethinking of security from the viewpoint of the most marginalised. It is a multidimensional policy framework that aims to elevate women’s and marginalised groups’ experiences and agency to scrutinise the destructive forces of patriarchy, capitalism, racism, and militarism. CFFP believes a feminist approach to foreign policy provides a powerful lens through which we can interrogate the hierarchical global systems of power that have left millions of people in a perpetual state of vulnerability.

A feminist perspective has been implemented in academic scholarship, but less so in policy practice. CFFP wants to draw lessons from key critical scholarships into tangible policy development and make discussions on foreign policy more accessible and democratic. In order to do this, we need to challenge the dominant narratives of international political discourse and push for structural and hierarchical change to challenge systems that perpetuate the status quo; the intertwined structures that sustain global patterns of oppression and discrimination must end. We ask difficult questions and engage those who have traditionally not been included in foreign policy in order to elevate the voices of those who’ve suffered from global injustices. This means emphasizing historicised, context-specific analyses of how destructive dichotomies play out in practice, as well as interrogating domestic and foreign policy decisions to push for a more just global order.

 

The Co-Founders

 
  Marissa Conway  | Co-Founder and UK Director | London  The idea for CFFP initially came about as Marissa earned her MA in Gender Studies at SOAS, University of London. While focusing her research on the ways in which feminist theory can rethink nuclear policy, she began to engage with feminist foreign policy and quickly became convinced of its value in rethinking the foreign policy status quo. Much of her personal feminist approach stems directly from the example of Cynthia Enloe's encouragement of a feminist curiosity, one which takes women's lives seriously.  Originally from Silicon Valley in California, Marissa moved to London in 2015 in pursuit of her MA. She also holds a BA in Political Science and a BA in Music from Chapman University in Orange County, California.  In addition to her work with CFFP, she is the CEO of Marissa Conway Creative, which helps feminist organisations tell their story through design and branding, and is the Director of Copywriting for Triarc, a social media firm. She is also a freelance writer and publishes pieces on feminist foreign policy, feminism, entrepreneurship, and life as a Californian in London.  Her areas of interest and research include: feminist foreign policy, nuclear nonproliferation, US foreign policy, UK immigration, masculinity, and feminist IR theory.  Follow her on  Twitter  and  Instagram  and view her  website  here.

Marissa Conway | Co-Founder and UK Director | London

The idea for CFFP initially came about as Marissa earned her MA in Gender Studies at SOAS, University of London. While focusing her research on the ways in which feminist theory can rethink nuclear policy, she began to engage with feminist foreign policy and quickly became convinced of its value in rethinking the foreign policy status quo. Much of her personal feminist approach stems directly from the example of Cynthia Enloe's encouragement of a feminist curiosity, one which takes women's lives seriously.

Originally from Silicon Valley in California, Marissa moved to London in 2015 in pursuit of her MA. She also holds a BA in Political Science and a BA in Music from Chapman University in Orange County, California.

In addition to her work with CFFP, she is the CEO of Marissa Conway Creative, which helps feminist organisations tell their story through design and branding, and is the Director of Copywriting for Triarc, a social media firm. She is also a freelance writer and publishes pieces on feminist foreign policy, feminism, entrepreneurship, and life as a Californian in London.

Her areas of interest and research include: feminist foreign policy, nuclear nonproliferation, US foreign policy, UK immigration, masculinity, and feminist IR theory.

Follow her on Twitter and Instagram and view her website here.

  Kristina Lunz  | Co-Founder and Germany Director | Berlin  Kristina onboarded as a co-founder of CFFP in January of 2018. Previously, she was with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Myanmar. Before that, Kristina worked for Sisma Mujer - a Colombian local women’s rights NGO - on the inclusivity of the country’s peace process around the time of the referendum in Bogotá late 2016.  Kristina graduated with distinction from University College London’s School of Public Policy. She did a second master’s at the Oxford Department of International Development in diplomacy. During her time in Oxford she started getting involved in activism and has been campaigning since. Amongst others, she was an advisor to UN Women National Committee Germany on the 'No Means No' campaign to change the German law on sexualised violence and rape. In July 2016 the law was changed making consent the criterion for rape – a milestone for the women’s rights movement. For another grassroots campaign, ‘Against sexualised violence and racism. #Ausnahmslos’, Kristina and her team were awarded a women’s rights prize by a German parliamentary party.  Educational equality and dismantling classism is another of Kristina’s passions. This is mainly inspired by her own story: Making it to Oxford against all odds as a working class girl from the countryside. This has led her to founding ‘Initiative: Augenhöhe’, a mentorship and leadership programme for working-class children from the village.  In addition Kristina has been the research advisor on international arms trade, and international security and female empowerment for the three times Nobel Peace Prize Nominee and founder of numerous NGOs, Dr Scilla Elworthy. She is also a freelance writer and frequently publishes on topics including activism, women’s rights, education, and international politics.  Follow her on  Twitter  and  Instagram  and view her  website  here.

Kristina Lunz | Co-Founder and Germany Director | Berlin

Kristina onboarded as a co-founder of CFFP in January of 2018. Previously, she was with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Myanmar. Before that, Kristina worked for Sisma Mujer - a Colombian local women’s rights NGO - on the inclusivity of the country’s peace process around the time of the referendum in Bogotá late 2016.

Kristina graduated with distinction from University College London’s School of Public Policy. She did a second master’s at the Oxford Department of International Development in diplomacy. During her time in Oxford she started getting involved in activism and has been campaigning since. Amongst others, she was an advisor to UN Women National Committee Germany on the 'No Means No' campaign to change the German law on sexualised violence and rape. In July 2016 the law was changed making consent the criterion for rape – a milestone for the women’s rights movement. For another grassroots campaign, ‘Against sexualised violence and racism. #Ausnahmslos’, Kristina and her team were awarded a women’s rights prize by a German parliamentary party.

Educational equality and dismantling classism is another of Kristina’s passions. This is mainly inspired by her own story: Making it to Oxford against all odds as a working class girl from the countryside. This has led her to founding ‘Initiative: Augenhöhe’, a mentorship and leadership programme for working-class children from the village.

In addition Kristina has been the research advisor on international arms trade, and international security and female empowerment for the three times Nobel Peace Prize Nominee and founder of numerous NGOs, Dr Scilla Elworthy. She is also a freelance writer and frequently publishes on topics including activism, women’s rights, education, and international politics.

Follow her on Twitter and Instagram and view her website here.

 

CFFP Germany

CFFP UK